Bookcase 2.jpg

CARL GOMBRICH - BLOG

Higher Education, Interdisciplinarity, and some related things like Expertise and Future of Work

Welcome to my new blog. You can read more about me in the About tab, top left. I'm looking forward to getting back to 'writing and thinking out loud' about Higher Education, Interdisciplinarity and other things that interest me. You can talk to me either here or on my linked Twitter feed.

 

Knowledge, Democratisation and Power

My job takes me to meet and speak with people who have radically different ideas about the nature of knowledge: its origins, its history, its future. I love these conversations. They are often profound even if they are problematic in revealing, in some ways, how far apart very intelligent people can be on what we might call fundamental questions for our individual and communal lives. When it comes to a history of knowledge, there have always been different views as to how our

Humanities – a source of future value?

This is my first vlog. I discuss how recent reports from think-tanks and discussions with major employers point to a re-evaluating of the humanities – not along the lines of their inherent or social value (that is a separate argument) but along purely monetary lines. References: Future Work Skills 2020 by the Institute for the Future See Also: Council for Industry and Higher Education Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities by Martha Nussbaum Valuing the Humanities

Future Universities – teaching low-tech

Lots on the future of universities in the air. I’m sorry I missed the series at Cambridge with Martin Rees, Stefan Collini and others talking on the subject. I am mostly concerned with undergraduate education, rather than research. Two themes come to mind in this regard. 1. How we address learning in the light of the technology and communication revolution. 2. How we address learning in the light of the tremendous challenges posed by the crisis in capitalism and the consumpti

Global anxieties, local hope

My current job takes me out to talk to young people. I visit schools, and also they come to our university to discuss the Arts and Sciences (BASc) degree. I enjoy these occasions a lot. Occasionally I get a little carried away and can’t contain my enthusiasm, and end up confusing the message a bit, but generally these are really good occasions – particularly when the students have plenty of time to ask questions and the visit becomes a genuine exchange, a conversation rather

Thoughts on the work of J M Greer: The Wealth of Nature

Reading The Wealth of Nature by J M Greer and enjoying it very much. The chapter called The Metaphysics of Money is particularly interesting and original – at least to me. Greer’s main message is that our civilization is, at best, in slow decline as we run out of the sort of concentrated energy needed to drive the industrial societies we have had in the West for about 400 years – and that we had better start to think of ways to live differently if we want to survive. But ther

Interdisciplinarity, future work and the learning of ‘languages’

Currently my work has me thinking about future employment, the world of work and the role of universities in preparing students for this aspect of their lives. For this blog entry, I want to put aside the issue of whether there is a conflict within universities between scholarship and preparing people for the world of work. There are other articles on things like this in this blog. Let’s assume here that the proportion of the population going to university will remain high an

Futuristic Money

My friend, the chemist and economist Peter Bowman, reminds me that money is ‘crystallised trust’. Another friend, the Art Historian Andrew Spira, describes money as ‘a promise’ . That is certainly what it says on the bank notes. And of course a promise and trust in that promise are intimately related. What is a promise that one cannot trust? Just useless words. But this view of money is profoundly immaterial. Ironic then that money in many descriptions is that great lubricant

 

Thanks for submitting!

 

CONTACT

Please use the webform

123-456-7890

Thanks for submitting!